Greece: ‘To Euro or Not to Euro’ is Not the Question We Should be Asking

Euro and GreecePublished: 7 August 2015
Author: Jonathan Clyne

In the face of the brutal blackmail of the Troika, the Syriza government broke its anti-austerity promises. Much of the debate since then has focused on whether the government could have avoided this by leaving the Eurozone. It is a debate that risks tearing Syriza apart. Many on the left believe that leaving is a decisive step towards resolving the Greek crisis. Leading Keynesian economists of various shades, such as Krugman and Stiglitz, and many British conservatives agree. They are wrong. As are those on the Left that argue that Greece must stay in the Euro. If Syriza splits on this question, both parts will end up in a dead-end.

The left and the right in Syriza and internationally are ignoring the most important means for resolving the Greek crisis – raising the level of productive investment in the Greek economy. In the last weeks before the climb-down, former Greek Finance Minister Varoufakis outlined a plan to do precisely that. It has not been commented on since. That is the most tragic thing about the present discussion. Varoufakis’s plan ought to be at the centre of discussion about how to end the crisis, not only in Greece, but also throughout the capitalist world. Staying in or leaving the Euro is a secondary question.

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Greece: Syriza, the Economists and the Impossible Triangle

3ED2-ECB-EuclidTsakalotosPublished: 23 Jan 2015
Author: Michael Roberts

All the polls show that the leftist Syriza alliance is set to win the general election in Greece next Sunday.  It may not get an outright majority and may have to form a coalition with one of the small centre parties.  But it looks most likely that the incumbent coalition of Samaras’ conservative New Democracy and the degenerated social-democrat PASOK will lose power.

Financial markets are getting worried and Greek government bonds have dropped sharply in price as investors fear a default.  Greek banks are losing deposits as Greek corporations and the rich (or at least those that have not already done so) shift their euros overseas.  Three banks are now asking for what is called Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) from the Greek central bank (in effect, liquid funds from the Eurosystem controlled by the European Central Bank).

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Opinion: What are the Possible Outcomes of the Greek Elections and their Likely Consequences?

syriza3Published: 6 January 2015
Source: Red Pepper
Intro: by TSN Editor

Following the failure of the Greek parliament to elect a President, the parliament has been dissolved and a fresh election will be held later this month. This election promises to be the most important in Europe since the economic crisis of 2008-9 and the austerity programme of cuts in public services and living standards imposed by the European Union on Greece and the rest of Europe. For the first time there is the possibility that an anti-austerity party, the Coalition of the Radical Left (SYRIZA), will be the leading party in the Greek elections. But will this be enough for Syriza to become the government and if so what will be the consequences? The following article which discusses these issues was recently published in the British Left-wing magazine, Red Pepper.

If Syriza wins the Greek election, what will happen next?
With Greece facing a snap general election on 25 January 2015, there is the genuine prospect of a radical left government coming to power in an EU country. Syriza, a party born from a coalition of Eurocommunists, social movements and anti-globalisation activists, is riding high.

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